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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Feinstein continued 6A: that point and then consider it. And requiring the NSA to send to the FISA court for its review, the records of each query of the database as soon as is practicable so the court can determine the propriety of the query under the law. These are things that can be done to increase transparency, but not to stop the program. I believe, based on what i have seen and i read intelligence regularly, that we would place this
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Feinstein continued 7A: nation in jeopardy if we eliminated these two programs. Thank you, Mr.. Chairman. Litt: My offer a brief response to that? Leahy: Just a moment and I will. Would you also include reporting how often NSA or anybody else goes into an individual's browsing history or their e-mails or social media activity? Feinstein: Sure, right. And we could do that for the private sector too. How often
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Litt : I wanted to say that i think the administration is more or less in the same place that Senator Feinstein is. We are open to re-evaluating this program in ways that can perhaps provide greater confidence and public trust that this
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Litt continued: is in fact a program that achieves both privacy protections and national security. And in fact, the white house -- directed the director of national intelligence to make recommendations in that area. So we will be looking forward to working with your committee and this committee to see whether there are changes that are made that are consistent with preserving the essence of the program and yet provide greater public confidence.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken: …protecting American’s privacy. But when almost everything about these programs is secret. And when the companies involved are under strict gag orders, the American public has no way of knowing whether we’re getting that balance right. I think that’s bad for privacy and bad for democracy. Tomorrow I'm introducing a bill to address this. It will force the government to disclose how many Americans have had their information collected under key authorities in the foreign intelligence
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 1: surveillance act. It will also force the government to disclose how many Americans have had their information reviewed by federal agents. My bill would also allow private companies to disclose aggregate figures about the number of FISA orders that they are receiving and the number of their users that these orders have affected. Two weeks ago a broad coalition of 63 internet companies and bipartisan civil liberties groups sent a letter to the president
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 2: asking for the reforms that my bill would make law. I'm proud to say that i am introducing my bill with the support of chairman Leahy, Senator Blumenthal and a number of other Senators who are not on the judiciary committee. From what I just heard from Senator Feinstein there may be some overlaps in our approaches and I’d be happy to work with her.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken: Transparency is part of that balance. I do not want a situation where the government is transparent only when it is convenient for the government. Litt: i think -- Franken: about an hour ago, ODNI declassified a FISA court order under section 215. That’s a good thing. But ODNI has know for weeks that this hearing was coming. And yet, ODNI
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 1A: released this material just a few minutes before the hearing began. Again it's a step forward, but you get the feeling when it’s ad hoc transparency. That doesn’t engender trust. Litt: i couldn’t agree with you more. I think we have an obligation to go through and look at the bad as well as the good and declassify what can be declassified without danger. We did actually have a discussion yesterday within the executive branch about whether or not we should
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 2A: release these documents this morning or not because it’s generally not a good idea to release things on the morning of the hearing. Litt: We came to the conclusion that once we made the determination that the documents should be declassified, there was no justification for holding them up any longer. Franken: Did you just start thinking about that decision, like, yesterday? You’ve know this for a long time. You might have thought about this weeks ago and said maybe not the day of. Litt: We have been thinking about this for some time
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